Thailand has about 20 more items of various patented drugs that could be candidates for compulsory licences, which will allow the government to exercise its right over the patent owners to cut prices and make the medicines available to the public

Thailand has in its pipeline about 20 more items of various patented drugs that could be candidates for compulsory licences, allowing the government to exercise its right over the patent owners to cut prices and make the medicines more available to the public. The items include drugs for treating hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia. They are drugs that are expensive but vital to the cure or treatment of Patients.

These 20 drugs are in addition to three drugs the government has already issued compulsory licences for and another four cancer-treatment medicines whose patent owners are likely to be subject to same kind of enforcement by the Public Health Ministry, unless a price cut is agreed soon. Last year, the Thai government first announced its use of compulsory licensing on two patented anti-retroviral drugs for HIV/AIDS patients (efavirenz, manufactured and marketed by Merck Sharp and Dohme as Stocrin, and lopinavir/ritonavir, manufactured and marketed by Abbott Laboratories as Kaletra) and another anti-coagulant for treating heart disease (clopidogrel, manufactured and marketed by Sanofi-Aventis as Plavix).

Efavirenz , Dohme, Docetaxel are drugs among a list of about 900 items of so-called national essential medicines that will be available to Thai people  for their treatment and cure at reasonable price under government-sponsored health insurance schemes. Thai government officials have insisted that compulsory licensing would be enforced on patented drugs used under these insurance programs only, and not for any commercial sale.