Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of the sanofi-aventis Group, has received licenses  from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to administered Daptacel (Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed) as a fifth consecutive diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine dose.

Daptacel vaccine is given to infants and children 6 weeks through 6 years (prior to 7th birthday) to prevent 3 serious diseases: diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), and pertussis (whooping cough). As with any vaccine, vaccination with Daptacel vaccine may not protect 100 per cent of individuals.

The approval of the fifth consecutive dose of Daptacel vaccine completes the FDA license for the entire five-dose Daptacel vaccine series enabling health-care professionals to administer the same brand of DTaP vaccine for the series as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). 

The fifth consecutive dose of Daptacel vaccine also provides a convenient fit with the CDC's recommended immunization schedule. According to the ACIP, AAP, and AAFP recommendations, these five doses should be administered before 7 years of age.

The safety of Daptacel vaccine was demonstrated in a clinical trial involving 487 children across 22 different trial sites who received DAPTACEL vaccine as a fifth consecutive dose. Out of the subjects included in the safety examination in this study, 98 percent (477/487) completed the 180- day safety follow-up after receiving the fifth dose. Of the 10 children (2 percent of 487) who did not complete the 180-day follow-up, 3 were lost to follow-up, 6 were discontinued due to noncompliance, and 1 withdrew voluntarily.

Following administration of Daptacel vaccine as the fifth dose, more than 93 percent of subjects experienced a booster response to each of the pertussis components.

Additionally, all participants (100 per cent) achieved antibody responses =0.1 IU/mL for both the tetanus and diphtheria antigens, indicating that protective levels had been achieved. In assessing long-term protection, the study found that 99.6 per cent (250/251) and 98.8 percent (248/251) of subjects achieved levels =1.0 IU/mL for diphtheria and tetanus, respectively.